Author: The Shapiro Law Group

New Policy Will Impact Spouse Visas

The Shapiro Law Group

In Aug. 2018, the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Service released updated guidance that people who apply for spousal visas must remain married and living together until they take the Oath of Naturalization. Previously, people were required to remain living together until the date that they applied for naturalization. Read the rest of this entry »




H-1B Visa Brings Hope to Nurses

The Shapiro Law Group

Deported or undocumented Illinois nurses might gain some hope for their cases after a California woman who had been deported was allowed to return on an H-1B visa. The woman and her husband were both undocumented immigrants who had lived and worked in the U.S. for two decades, had three U.S.-citizen children and one with DACA status, and had no criminal records. Read the rest of this entry »


Who Is Recognized as a Spouse for Immigration Purposes

The Shapiro Law Group

For a person to be recognized as a spouse for immigration purposes, the validity of the marriage must be established. For a foreign national to get a spousal visa or green card to live and work in the U.S., the person must be legally married to a U.S. citizen or lawful permanent resident and the marriage must be bona fide. Neither of the spouses can be married to other people. Read the rest of this entry »


Limiting Legal Immigration Makes Labor Shortage Worse

The Shapiro Law Group

Businesses in Illinois are suffering from a labor shortage in part because of the limits that the Trump Administration has placed on legal immigration. The government has been delaying approvals of work visas, requesting additional information, and denying more applicants. Businesses have stated that they have struggled to fill their open positions Read the rest of this entry »


MIlitary Spouses Facing Citizenship Struggles

The Shapiro Law Group

Despite the military service of their husbands and wives, military spouses who are in the country illegally may be deported and might need help to adjust their statuses. One does not need to be U.S. citizens to join the U.S. Armed Forces, but they do have to be lawful permanent residents. Read the rest of this entry »